Why you need to know about GOTS organic cotton: it’s safe, kind & fair

GOTS

Consumer habits are changing

Increasingly, people are obsessing with what goes into their bodies, shopping for organic produce such as free-range eggs, organic vegetables, going gluten free and participating in Veganuary.

But what about the clothes we wear and the sheets we sleep in?

Conventionally grown cotton uses more insecticides and pesticides than any other crop in the world. Its production is toxic, thirsty and energy intensive. Do we really want to invite these chemicals into our home and have these against our skin? We have the opportunity to adjust our consumer habits by switching to organic with the fabrics/textiles we buy, in the same way as we have been doing with food produce.

Why organic cotton?

Organic cotton is cultivated using environmentally friendly methods and has a low impact on the environment. Organic cotton does not contain any genetically engineered substances or synthetic chemicals and it has been grown without pesticides. It promotes safe work and better livelihoods to keep farmers and their families safe. It also has the added benefit of being bio-degradable.

We believe that everyone has a social responsibility and people are becoming increasingly conscious of environmental issues and the impact their consumer choices have.

Is all organic cotton really organic?

To develop Linen Quarter, my husband and I undertook a lot of research into textile production and the bed linen market. We continue to be amazed and somewhat flabbergasted as to the misinformation that exists out there. Some of this we have touched upon in one of our previous blogs ‘Thread count explained’.

One of the things we have been amazed by (and to be honest disappointed by) is that textile products do not have to be certified in order to be described as organic. A product “claiming” to be organic might only contain a small percentage of organic cotton or may be made of organic cotton but dyed using toxic chemicals, which would never be allowed in certified organic products. This is truly shocking! Surely this is not right, yet it’s “allowed.”

How can you be sure what you are buying is truly organic?

To be sure that a product really is organic from the cotton field to the finished product, you should look out for the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) symbol. Other symbols do exist, but GOTS is the world’s leading textile processing standard for organic fibres. All of our bedding is made from GOTS certified organic cotton.

What is the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS)?

GOTS certification is the worldwide leading textile producing standard for organic fibres, including ecological and social criteria, backed up by independent certification of the entire textile supply chain – from seed to fabric. Throughout the quality management process, it is ensured that at every stage no chemical pesticides, harmful bacteria or synthetic fertilisers have been used in the final product, allowing products to be internationally GOTS certified.

The standard’s aim is to define globally recognised requirements that ensure the organic status of textiles, from harvesting of the raw materials through environmentally and socially responsible manufacturing all the way to labelling, to provide credible assurance to the end consumer. So no matter where you are in the world, you can look for the GOTS logo to know that your bedding (and clothes) are safe for you, your family and the planet.

All of our organic cotton bed linen is GOTS certified. Certified organic cotton delivers proven benefits for farmers, their families and the environment. When it comes to making sustainability claims you can trust, nothing beats certified organic cotton.

What’s the difference between ‘organic’ and ‘made with organic’?

GOTS has two types of label grades: ‘organic’ and ‘made with organic’. The difference between the two GOTS labels is that ‘organic’ has to contain a minimum of 95% certified organic fibres; whilst ‘made with organic’ has to contain a minimum of 70% certified organic fibres. You can recognise GOTS certified clothes and bedding by the GOTS logo with the label ‘organic’ or ‘made with organic’.

Rest assured, all of our bedding is labelled as ‘organic’. We believe it’s simply the best and everyone, including you, deserves the best. We spend a third of our lives in bed, so why not spoil yourself!

GOTS goes further than sustainability. Its social impact is immense

To be GOTS certified, social criteria based on the key norms of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) must be met by all processors and manufacturers. These cover minimum wages, working hours, no child labour, no discrimination, as well as safe and hygienic work conditions. This, as well as the environmental side of organic cotton, is critical to the quality of life of all the people (and their families) along the journey from plant to duvet (or pillow case or fitted sheet).

But wait, there’s more…

All of our bedding is produced using 100% green energy through the use of wind power and 99% of water used in the manufacturing process is recycled. We think this is pretty great, don’t you?

Can making the switch to GOTS certified cotton bedding really make an impact?

When you buy Linen Quarter’s bedding, you are not only buying the most beautifully soft sheets. We can trace back to the origin of our cotton, right back to the seed, so you and your family feel confident knowing our products are authentic, pure and chemical free. We can also assure you that the working conditions for the people who made our products are fair and safe. 

You can sleep easier at night knowing where your bed linen comes from, and that you’ve played a part in protecting and improving the lives of others.

We know you will love our organic cotton bed linen as much as we do.

Sara x

Browse our range of GOTS certified organic cotton bedding here

Other blogs we have produced that might interest you: ‘Organic cotton bed linen – 7 reasons why you should switch

Thank you to www.cottonedon.org and www.global-standard.org for some of the information in today’s blog.